Thursday, September 16, 2010

An Open Letter...

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... to brick & mortar quilt shops.

I visited a large quilt shop yesterday and walked away empty handed and disappointed.  Here are some observations:

  1. Be friendly.  It's not hard to smile and greet someone who walks through the door.  A simple "hello" will work. "What brings you in today?" is even better.
  2. If a customer asks if you have binding clips, please don't respond with "no, in our classes we don't teach our customers to use those".  I guess I'm not one of your customers...
  3. If a customer asks if you carry a certain line of fabric or a certain designer, please don't wrinkle your nose and tell me that  you don't like that line.  BTW, I was asking about Hope Valley...
  4. If a customer is looking at bolts of fabric please don't walk in front of them and start putting bolts away right where they were looking without even a simple acknowledgement.  Really??
  5. Don't assume that a younger customer is not a good potential customer.  Treat your customers the same; young and old.  Greet and speak to everyone.  Yes, your regulars who happen to be retired are important but younger quilters are your shop's future!
And lastly, do you have any idea how much $$ I spend on fabric...online?? LOL  Why?  Because I get friendly service, personal attention, and encouragement in my favorite hobby.  Sure, I may pay shipping but it's worth it.  There are even sales online that include more fabric than just a tiny selection of cat fabric. ;)

I correspond with a lot of new quilters and I hear at least one a week talking about how intimidating shopping for fabric is in a quilt shop and it's not the large number of bolts of fabric that scare them away.  The "sewing circle" mentality can be intimidating and downright discouraging.  No wonder the number of quilting blogs, tutorials, and fabric shops have exploded online... 

I'm glad I wasn't a new quilter going into that shop yesterday because I'm afraid I might have left very discouraged.  So to the new quilters out there, don't let a store experience discourage you.  For every un-helpful quilter, there are five more ready to help a new quilter out.

I know there are fabulous quilt shops out there, I just happen to not live near any of them.  There is a new one that just opened up near my office and while it is small, it has potential.  I shop there as much as I can and I really hope that it can overcome the stigma that quilt shops around here are developing.  If you happen to have a great quilt shop near you, support it and appreciate it because they are hard to find!

59 comments:

BaileyGirl5 said...

Amen! I have a friendly quilt shop near me and I try to go there as often as I can ... but .... their fabric is not what I'm looking for at all. Want mauve calico?? They got it!!

kheli said...

Agreed. The "inner-circle" attitude is self-defeating. I am fortunate to deal with a shop that embraces all who walk through their doors, but I have been to shops with the same attitude you mention (just once, I know when I'm not wanted.) And I agree about the online shopping experience, I have received awesome service from all the online shops I have frequented. And I have quite a bit of quilting cash, so I take it where it is welcomed!

Traci said...

This is SOOO true. I used to always assume it was because I was young (I've been quilting since I was a teenager), but I'm nearing 30 and when I walk in I still feel that Edge, so I don't think it's an age thing. I think it's an "outsider" thing. It's sad that they're missing out on an entire group of people who will easily take their money online (where the fabrics are much more attractive anyway).

Natalie said...

Ditto. In fact, I think you read my mind. Did you see Lizzy House's video from market a couple of months ago on her blog? The way us younger quilters are treated is sad really...and what I find really frustrating is that I am treated like royalty when I shop with my mother in law but when I go in by myself I'm ignored and if by chance someone does help me, I am treated rudely. You would think in this economy that they would try and get any sale they could and therefore treat every customer like royalty, young and old. I keep thinking I'm going to win them over with kindness but it hasn't happened yet. My friend Kate and I are thinking about opening our own fabric shop but it's expensive to get started.

Garilyn said...

Oh, so true! I have shopped at a local store (not a quilt shop) and twice, the same girl, has made comments about the fabric choice I have made! First, she'll ask what I'm making (both times a dress. Then, she told me she didn't like the fabric that I picked out! Did I ask her opinion? NO. The next time also asking what I was making, she proceeds to say to the other employee beside her, "I don't see how anyone can like paisley." The only think funny that time was that the other employee didn't even know what paisley was!!

elizabeth said...

I am not sure that age is always the problem because I have had it happen to me...recently, in a Colorado shop....and I am old enough to be a mother in law : ) My local quilt shops are not that way...they are very customer friendly. However, I also enjoy the variety of fabric choices and the convenience of the internet! (I have discovered some new designers that I like just like you younger quilters, and I am learning so much-- from blogging to modern quilting.)

AMKreations said...

There aren't many quilt shops near me, but the one has nice service, the other the ladies were very "snoody" and that's being polite! =) I do wish they wouldn't only extend sales to people in quilting guilds and the like. I like sales too...I just haven't gotten to join any guilds and such...I'm a WAHM...my time is very limited and I'm just getting started. Be nice to us! =)

Lee said...

Thank you for this post! This is all so true. Most quilting stores have felt very unwelcoming to me, and I'm not sure why, other than that I don't fit the mold of their usual customer. And god forbid I should try to bring my kids into a quilting store! Believe me, I don't want to bring them either, but I usually don't have a choice!

So I too buy a ton of fabric online (too much). I think it's the quilting equivalent of when Julia Roberts went on her shopping spree in Pretty Woman, and the snobby sales ladies wouldn't help her. "You work on commission, right? Big mistake. HUGE."

Sandy said...

omg....yes! it's exactly like that near me...only they're pretty nice - but it's like they run their shop like a club just for them and their friends....why oh why don't these places carry TONS of designer fabrics? I don't get it. I do all my shopping on-line too - I swear it makes me want to open my own place...(-:

Lee Ann said...

yeah, this is a totally true post.

For the most part, I try to ignore the rudeness of the staff and just shop. I'm deaf (but I can speak and read lips well); so, I'm used to rudeness anyway. It shouldn't be that way; but, that's life for me!

I have moved 2 years ago and haven't been inside a quilt shop here until recently. I went inside two and the first one was majorly disappointing; but, the second one had both young and old people as part of staff. And, they were nice. So, it's promising even though it's about a 25 minute drive from my house.

If they (quilt shops) want to survive in this tough economic times, they need to learn to cater and be nice to everyone. Several quilt shops failed where I used to live simply because of the very things mentioned in the post.

Sabah said...

You're right! I was trying to be polite and not notice, but it's true. The first shop I ventured into was like that, and put me off for a couple weeks. The next one was like that too, and the Bernina Store near my house!

Then I found this online quilting presence and by chance, was driving home from an interview and was about to pass another Bernina (in Phoenix, on Indian School east of 40 st) I thought, why not?

Outstanding staff, huge selection of current fabric and Windows! made it welcoming and inspiring. I spent as much there as I would online!

Jane said...

I have also experienced the unfriendliness, etc. and I am definitely not young. It is frequently the same way in yarn shops. We are always encouraged to "support" local businesses, but I don't feel obligated to support any business just because it is local. If they are unfriendly and overly expensive, I prefer to spend my money elsewhere...online.

felicity said...

YIKES! What a horrible customer experience they gave you. What a shame. Good for you for speaking up. Unfortunately, those shop owners are probably not online, keeping up with the trends in quilting so they won't get your message!

I'd be tempted to write a letter to the store and sign it as, "a lost customer" or somesuch. Ugh.

Erica said...

I had the same type experience, but on the phone! I was looking for a specific fabric and live in the middle of nowhere. I called a quilt shop about an hour away and asked them if they had this fabric. The lady gruffly told me no and hung up! I was in the process of asking another question! The next day I was in the area of this shop wanting to shop for fabric and didn't stop there. I drove another hour out of my way to go somewhere else where I received wonderful service and spent more money than I had originally planned!

Linda said...

I have been in quilt shops all over the U.S. and have been in a few that I couldn't wait to leave! Sometimes, though, when I've gone back I've been welcomed with open arms and had a great experience. I think we need to put the blame on the salespeople who made our experience bad, not on the shop as a whole. The owner may be wonderful but unaware of the reception her sales crew is giving. She(or he) should be told about the experience you had. If it turns out that the owner is the one giving the bad impression, I doubt that store will be around very long! (I've actually asked helpful sales persons what days they usually work and those are the days I visit!)

Wandering Minstrel said...

I was fortunate that the local shop where I first took classes to learn to quilt was wonderful and welcoming--even though I was in my late 20s and very much the 'youngster' in the shop! I think it made a difference, though, that several of the ladies who worked there were relatively young, too (as in, well below retirement age).

That said, I'm quickly discovering that fabric selection online is far, far more appealing to me than what I've seen in most of the local shops. :)

AnneMarie said...

It seems we've all experienced the "clique"ish ways of some shops....if they only knew the sales they were missing!

I've had people email me saying my Gen X Quilters blog was basically not worth doing - b/c the niche was so small. Unbelievable! I've met SO many new friends.

I think the truth will be obvious (that there are tons of younger quilters out there) as the quarterly sales for hip fabrics continue to climb. We are definitely a growing market!

AnneMarie @ Gen X Quilters

live a colorful life said...

This was very well written, sad but true. I worked in a LQS for two years, owned by three women. They spent all their time in the back of the shop and wanted to employees to greet the customers in a friendly way. Apparently it wasn't up to them to maintain a friendly presence. The interesting thing is that all three were previous employees before they became cliquish owners. I rarely go in there. I find what I want (I find way too much...) online and have received over-and-above customer service from the shops that I frequent. It comes to my door, saves me time and money, even counting shipping. Before and after I was an employee in the LQS, I used to think, "I drop a LOT of $$$$$ here. You should be a little happier to see me..." My online shop owners give me the appreciation that I feel ANY quilter, young or not as young, spending a little or a lot, deserves.

Ellen said...

LOVE the letter! I think I know the LQS you are talking about! I have to tell you, I appreciate your honesty, and how . . . delicately . . . you put everything! I saw you were a member of the DMQG, I hope to meet you at the next meeting! :)

Sarah said...

It breaks my heart when I hear about experiences like this, but sadly they seem to happen all too often. I have a new brick and mortar fabric shop in Seattle that is aimed at the newer quilters and garment sewists out there. All I can say is there are more and more of us popping up around the country and I hope you find us when you're out shopping!

Jenny Garland said...

So frustrating and *completely* agree. It's difficult to support a LQS when they are rude and completely inattentive/unhelpful. No wonder online shopping has exploded.

Jessica said...

I can't tell you how many times I've walked into the one of the fabric stores in my area and experienced what you talk about in this post. There are, of course exceptions to this and I actually get friendly help, but overall I usually walk away with a sour taste in my mouth. Couple that with the lack of fabrics geared more toward younger, modern sewers and you have the very reasons I decided to start selling fabrics online--with the eventual hopes of having a brick and mortar shop in my area. I'm a firm believer that each of us should be more encouraging of others and less exclusive. And this carries over online, too.

Nathalie said...

Where is the new quilt store in the Dallas area? I used to be a regular at one of the stores there even though I live 300+ miles away. However, they are no longer and another store has taken their place and they are not as wonderful and welcoming.

Always Sewing said...

Oh that was so well said!!! Just because you do not know me, does not mean I am not a experienced quilter. And yes I would like to see more modern fabric, so if you do not care I will shop on-line, where they do care.

Thank you for venting for us and letting us join in on your rant. ^_^

stitchinpenny said...

I went to a new to me quilt shop a little over an hour away from home today. The people were great. I was modifying a pattern by using my choice if fabrics. The pattern of course was set of for the fabric line. The clerk who couldn't have been 20 was very nice. She labelled each piece with the yardage and the corresponding fabric name on the pattern. She looked for a matching fabric when I was getting frustrated abd told me the story behind a couple of patterns they sold in the store. The other clerk helped out too and both were familiar with the stock and wre great, I have visited the same type of shop you visited, but today makes me love exploring small town shops. This was by the way a quiltshop/pharmacy/radioshck/cellphone store. They treated everyone well.

Karen said...

This is so true! I just started quilting in July. The clerks at the LQS weren't really helpful when they learned I was a first time quilter. They tried but I was looking for a simple pattern and they didn't have anything I found interesting. I'm so happy I came across a Halloween charm pack that I feel in love with.

Abby said...

As my husband and I browsed through the VERY small selection of Amy Butler at a local quilt shop, one of the ladies teaching a class in the back noticed what we were looking at and commented to me how she didn't understand what the young women see in those fabrics. I may be 30, but I kinda consider myself a young woman when it comes to the quilting world. Seriously? Now obnoxiously rude!

Abby said...

Oh, and City Craft in Dallas is at Lovers and Inwood right off the Toll Road. Great people, great classes, great fabric. Modern and plentiful! Google them :)

Rachel said...

I also have experienced everything you stated. But, out of all of these, my biggest complaint is the weak fabric selection. Not everyone is into Civil War or 1930's reproduction fabric. I have an appreciation for it, but it's not all there is. I think the biggest mistake so many quilt shop owners make is only buying fabric that they like. Shopping online is not as enjoyable for me, but I do it so I can get what I want. Do you think they realize at all how much money they are losing?

Teresa Jane said...

I so hear you sista'. I live in a city that has several quilt/fabric shops. Of this selection, there are 3 that do not see me anymore. My favorites are actually out of town, 40 and 60 minutes away! Why do I drive past 3 to go to a shop in a small town? Service, attitude and a smile. That's why.
Oh, and the other 3? They wonder why their shops are always empty. I wonder how they stay in business!

Carla said...

Jennifer, there are some of those in KC too! I just can't understand how a shop can not greet a customer. While on vacation in Colorado this summer I asked my husband to stop so I could visit a quilt shop. I was the only customer in the store. I walked by the woman working on hanging some notions and stopped right beside her. She never spoke. I am a grandmother of six. I don't think it's really the age of the shopper. I feel like every shopper should ask for the type of fabric they are looking for to let the owner know that they need to update their selection. Excellent topic! Your post should be forwarded to some shopowners!

Peggi said...

I'm very lucky because I live near several wonderful quilt shops and fabric stores, plus a huge warehouse of fabric (Fabric Depot). I am blessed to have lots of choices. However, there is ONE shop near me that I refuse to enter. The owner specializes in batiks, which I love, but the last time I was there, she became VERY intrusive, asking personal questions that were way over the line, and even made a comment about how my dad (the man who raised me since I was born) was not my biological dad - and she said this in front of my 8 year old son. I was furious and walked out. I have no idea how or where she came across this information.

angela said...

Are you a member of the DMQG...I am new to that group and love your perspective. I am also a new sewer/quilter and understand the intimidation factor (even though I am not young!)....

Mari said...

Buying fabric in a real store can be so intimidating! So nice to know it is not just me who feels that way, so thank you for sharing! Luckily there are also some good ones out there as well.

Rebecca Johnson said...

mmmm LOVE IT!! xxx And yes,... is there something wrong with people who dont like cat fabric??? I dont think so!! xx

The Scrappy Bee said...

This is very interesting. I don't shop at many quilt/fabric stores and I am an older quilter. I found out about the wonderful new trends in quilting on line. I have found young quilters have a fresh new take on quilting/sewing and I find it marvelous. Although I will be using up the fabrics I bought when I was younger, I do buy on line to get new designs, solids and to lighten up. Keep sticking up for yourselves. Tell the shop owners what you want!! If enough of you speak up you might get thru to them. After all younger quilters will be buying fabric for the next 20 - 30 years plus and shops should be courting your business if they want to stay in business. You will become their bread and butter. Bonnie (a retirement age quilter)

Susan said...

Excellent post. Amen to you!

oldbatt said...

Thank you for a great letter - I just wish the LQS would read it! I live in MN and even the one big quilt store that is fabulous is a huge clique! The smaller quilt stores are worse - if they don't know you because you haven't lived in the area for 50 years then they could care less. I worked at a quilt store in CO and I tried to greet everyone and also asked to see their quilts they brought in and find something good about it even if I didn't like it - who cares what I think? What matters is what the quilter thinks. Currently I can't even afford to shop at quilt shops but besides the fabulous fabrics, I am really not missing out on anything. Best, Lisa

Pam said...

I'm glad (and sad) to seem I'm not the only one who has had this experience in a brick and mortar quilt shop. I've had at least 3 shop owners or workers treat me like that. It's very discouraging and needless to say I don't go to those stores anymore. I enjoy shopping online so much more and the choices are endless. I have a somewhat local shop claim they carry 8000 bolts, yet they do not carry Moda. Half of their collection is made up of batiks, one-fourth are older, ugly prints and maybe one-fourth is newer fabrics. And they are very rude. I'm not going to spend my money there. One lady that was cutting fabric was eating Lays potato chips. Now that's just wrong.

Belinda said...

I agree with the others who suggested sending this letter to the LQS that treated you this way! I'm one of those "older" folks. I love both the traditional fabrics/styles but find myself more energized by the newer, more modern aesthetic. Had I been treated the way you describe when I was a much younger new quilter, I probably wouldn't be the sewer/quilter I am today! Definitely check out the City Craft Boutique in Dallas - a delightful place :-)

meagangracie said...

So sad how frequent of a story this is! I live in a town with a high population of retirees that people visit looking for historical flair, so I always assumed the taste in the fabric shop just went along with that. I went to one shop on vacation where I was surprised not to see any solid fabrics, but the lady noticed that I loved the few Heather Bailey laminates she had and said that they'd be getting more modern designers soon. That's nice customer service! Of course that town was big enough to have 3 quilt shops, each serving a different segment of the population. I started quilting because of the designer fabric I found online that was so different from what I had ever seen in stores, and I think other people have had the same experience, if only that fabric was more widely available. The only other store that I've been to (also when traveling) that stocked modern prints was charging $10-12/yard, which is hard to justify when I can pay shipping fees and still get them for less. If that was my LQS, though, I'd try to support them.

Kathy said...

I think we need to say some LQS's are GREAT and deserve recognition for that. I went into my LQS and they LISTEN when I asked if they are getting in a fabric. Ran into a coworker there and the same thing with her - she was looking for a specific fabric.
They can't buy in bulk like some of the onlines (which by the way are sometimes more expensive and then we have to wait for the fabric!) so their costs will be higher. I will say the onlines that can buy in bulk tend to be the higher priced - ironic! Most onlines are also LQS and also buy smaller amounts.
LQS have to contend with their small buying power - some manufacturers do "vaperware" buys. The LQS has to say they are ordering XX bolt(s) along with a lot of other retailers and then the manufacturer will PRINT the fabric. Even then the LQS is not guaranteed they will receive their order .
I appreciate my LQS because 1)they greet and say goodbye to every customer 2) they provide a good RIGHT there selection 3) great classes and 4) no age discrimination that I can see (an 8 year old was in front of me in line - yes I said EIGHT - she was buying a few fat quarters).
And I agree that not all LQS are like that. Hopefully the ones that are not will LISTEN and LEARN before they go out of business.

My bottom line - its a tough business and I appreciate a LQS that does listen to their customers!

Madame Samm said...

Bless you for bringing this forward...May I share??? I have 3 shops within the vicinity of our humble abode...Where do I shop??? 99% from the online shops in the U.S. I am Canadian. If any of these shops near me had any idea how much money I do spend every month, on Fabric and notions they would be thinking they won the lottery. The online shops I do deal with in the U.S. are absolutely over the top amazing. I get letters of appreciation, written ones...these shops have me for life. I could not agree more with you. Businesses today need a good overhaul in customer service. And sugar...it has nothing to do with being young...I am an attractive retire...I just don't think they really care!
So kudos to you, perhaps some of these Brick and Mortar stores will see this...
blessings madame samm

Thimbleanna said...

Wow, it's hard to imagine in the big city that you don't have better opportunities. Although, I guess I can relate a little -- we have two shops in town and, while they're fairly friendly, there are other things that don't really float my boat LOL.

Cara @ Me? A Mom? said...

Oh, Jennifer, I could have written this! I have the same experience here in my hometown. I always think about that scene in Pretty Woman when she goes back to the boutiques and shows them they missed out on getting her money. I want to sometimes roll in a wagonful of my stash and say, "See, I buy LOTS of fabric. Too bad for you, you snotty, unfriendly quilt shop person!" :)

Becky said...

I just found your blog. Sorry you had a bad time. Fabric shopping should above all be FUN! I live in Oregon, previously in Michigan (Oregon, Louisiana, Kentucky, Louisiana LOL). BUT my family all moved to Dallas after Katrina. On my last visit to see my family, I found the shop "Happiness is Quilting", in McKinney, TX: http://www.happinessisquilting.com/store/pc/home.asp I know Dallas is HUGE, but if you're in that area, check them out. They're a real gem!!

Kristen said...

Sigh... Me too. My favorite shop is closing and the others in town assume a 30 something has no experience sewing! And I live in a decently sized town too. I have to agree etsy and online shops have wonderful people and that is why I shop there more often than not.

Meg said...

Sadly, I have to raise my hand on this one, too. I've got 3 LQSs within a 45 minute drive of me. Unless I'm desperate, I only go to one. The one I go to doesn't have a lot of selection, but they carry Amy Butler, and they service my sewing machine, which I also bought there.

Of the others, one has a proprietress right out of a Dickens novel: she doesn't say much, she watches every move I make in her tiny shop, and my attempts to chat or ask about certain lines of fabric are met with stony silence. At the other shop, the ladies wrinkled their noses at my selections as they cut, and when I said it wasn't for a single project (though I'm tempted to put the baby pink together with the bright orange just because I can) but to fill a couple of gaping holes in my stash, I was met with looks like I'd just spit on their floor.

It is really, really disheartening to WANT to support the independent brick and mortar shop owners, but I really wish they'd try to support their new, younger customers, too!

ByTheSea said...

I don't think it is age I am in my fifties and I have gotten that. I think maybe they should know that we discuss the shops online and that isn't good business. I know I don't go back if I am treated badly. How sad for them.

Nichole said...

i had a similar, but not so extreme experience at a local quilt shop recently as well. it's really a shame since going to an actual shop is so much more fun than shopping online. i hope the small shop near your work turns out being a better option.

on a side note, i have found bobby pins work exceptionally well as "binding clips". they're also cheaper too- always a bonus! :)

Jessica said...

this is a great letter....it is so frustrating when you get that from a shop...and I bet I could guess which shop this was out of 2 locally I was very disappointed in...I mostly shop at 2 or 3 shops in the metroplex that are way further away simply because the ladies working make all the difference...

Diane said...

ok, you must tell me where this was because it sounds like the place I went in at 4:45, had two bolts ready to cut and was doing a little last min look when they turned the lights out on me!!!! and told me they would cut what I had (infering I was not to look any more) I have driven far and wide in the area looking for a LQS and have found a couple that I like, but they are a haul.

Anonymous said...

Just wanted to say this has nothing to do with age - and everything to do with management style. If the owners promote friendliness and customer service, the staff will follow. If not, well....this is what happens. I had it happen in a huge quilt store on the north edge of Dallas. I was completely ignored for the 20 minutes I was in there while the gals cut kits off to the side. They looked up when I walked in but did NOT SAY A WORD! How's that for rude?

Bea Lippott said...

Thats's terrible. It's amazing how some retail shops treat their customers. I'm very stuck in the stores I will shop at and the stores I won't. Here where I love their is a shop walking distance and I would walk their in a blizzard to shop or even help them. The store that has been in business for years I went once the ladies were rude and I haven't been back since. I don't care if they have the repo fabrics my fav store doesn't.

H2Ogirl said...

Well, I'm not the only one that has just been snuffed by a brick and mortar. So happy I'm not the only one that shops online happily.

Tonya said...

Wow, I consider myself so blessed! There are two quilt stores where I live. One has more traditional fabric that isn't my taste, but they also have a huge selection of kona solids, which I love. The other one has a very diverse selection of fabric, something for everyone, but not many solids. So I shop at both! However, the best thing is, the women and men who own them are so nice and helpful! I am a mom of 8, so don't have time to go to the classes, so am not in their clique. But I am always treated like a valued customer. I also frequent two yarn shops and a needlework shop and everyone there is friendly and helpful too! I live in South Louisiana, and find Southern people are just naturally very friendly. Maybe this explains why all my local shop owners are so nice? Whatever it is, I am counting my blessings after reading all of the horror stories here.....I think I will let all of them know what a wonderful job they are doing next time I am in their shops!

kayleighinstitches said...

I was so bummed to walk into my fave quilt shop (run by a young mother and her family) to find that they were closing their doors. There are other shops nearby but the vibe and welcome atmosphere isn't there. So I'm falling back to online shopping just for the sake of simplicity and not having that judgmental feeling around me. I'm young, I'm a very new beginner in quilting but I have passion where I lack skills and if someone would just be open and teach rather than snobby and closed off, I could possibly learn more to pass onto future generations.

Nicholas said...

I fell down an internet rabbit hole and totally loved this letter, especially as a guy who wanders into fabric shops and get stared at.

My favorite line ever: "You know who Anna Maria Horner is?"

Why, yes, yes I do.

Rookie Bebe said...

I haven't been to a certain quilt store on the northside of Atlanta in a few years. The other day I had just enough time after work in terrible rain to get there 20 minutes before they closed to get paper hexagon shapes and maybe a new FQ or two or three. When I walked in the door, I'm not sure the first lady said hi to me and I came face to face with the second one coming down the stairs. She didn't ask if she could help me, I practically had to corner one of the 5 workers if they had what I was looking for. (They did, I'd called ahead).

No one asked if they could help me. It will be awhile before I go in again.
Lindsey

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